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September 9, 2013

Nature's Tiniest Potters

Did you know there are small wasps here in Los Angeles that are potters? No, I don't mean some sort of weird waspish Harry Potter fan club—although that sounds like something I'd be totally into—I mean wasps that use mud to make miniature pots. Take a look at the craftsmanship, the sharply narrowed neck and that wide fluted rim, exquisite!

Photo taken by NHM Head Gardener Richard Hayden, with my fingertip for some perspective!

This "pot" was constructed by a small wasp (one of those solitary wasps that are not prone to stinging us humans), which entomologists call potter wasps. However, this wasp wasn't just being artistic, she constructed this pot for a purely utilitarian function—it is actually a nest for an egg!

A few weeks ago during a California Naturalist training, I spotted this beauty on one of our Baccharis plants in the Nature Gardens. Richard snapped a picture for me, as I was hoping there would be a way to identify the species of wasp that made this piece of pottery. I posted the picture to the Bugguide website, and had some luck!

According to Ken Wolgemuth this nest was constructed by a potter wasp in the genus Eumenes, which literally translated from Greek means "gracious, kindly." Although if you were an immature moth or beetle, you wouldn't necessarily think so well of them. In fact you might find another explanation for  the name more appropriate, even if it is less likely to be true. Some say the name is derived from Eumenides, the Greek winged goddesses of a vengence, and since these winged wasps provision their nests with caterpillars and grubs, it seems like poetic justice to me!

After the nest has been constructed, the female wasp lays an egg, and then flies off to find and sting small caterpillars or grubs. The paralyzed prey is deposited in the pot alongside the egg, and the pot is sealed up. Which eerily reminds me of scenes from horror films where people are buried alive! Soon after the egg hatches and devours the still fresh insect meat, and then pupates. The adult wasp emerges to complete the cycle over again and lend a hand in controlling pesky moths and beetles in your garden!

Dying to see what these wasps look like? Here's a picture to satisfy your curiosity:

Photo of a Floridian potter wasp, Eumenes fraternus, from What's That Bug website

 

 



Posted by:Lila Higgins

Hi, I like your blog a lot. A friend turned me on to your (old)blog to check out the cute baby possum photo, then I found my way here. I thought you might find this interesting: http://xenolithic.blogspot.com/2013/08/butterflies-do-not-mate-on-wing.html

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