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September 12, 2011

Paper Wasps Sting Museum Taxidermist!

When Tim Bovard, the Museum's taxidermist, told me about getting stung by wasps on the fourth floor patio, I had to investigate, especially since I sometimes eat lunch up there. During a much needed afternoon break from my computer, I went in search of the offenders.

What I found on my afternoon foray were some large and impressive nests, definitely worthy of a blog entry. So of course I asked Sam if he would take pictures for me, and I went to work identifying them. 
Common paper wasp nest, Polistes exclamans
The species living on our patio are Common Paper Wasps, Polistes exclamans, which have a widespread distribution through much of the southern United States. These insects construct a papery nest from fibers they gather off dead wood or plant stems. Next time you see a paper wasp on a wooden fence realize it might be chewing off tiny pieces of wood which they will mix with their own saliva to make paper! The nests are umbrella shaped and generally built under eaves or porches, or in similarly sheltered locations. Unlike yellowjackets and hornets, paper wasp nests are not enclosed in a papery shell, which give a really good view into the individual cells.
A view into a brood chamber, can you see the larva?
Sam was also able to get some great video footage of the wasps at work. In an effort to provide the best video documentation ever, Sam nearly sustained a few stings himself. Luckily the wasps went for the video camera instead!



Posted by:Lila Higgins

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Great video! Only at a museum would wasps turn into a documentation of how they live instead of being a complete nuisance!

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Show Comments

Great video! Only at a museum would wasps turn into a documentation of how they live instead of being a complete nuisance!

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The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.