bats http://www.nhm.org/nature/taxonomy/term/38/all en We Have a Bat Detector, and Bats Too! http://www.nhm.org/nature/blog/we-have-bat-detector-and-bats-too <p>Guess&nbsp;what? We have bats in the Nature Gardens! And we have proof, thanks&nbsp;to two of our intrepid scientists, Jim Dines and Miguel Orde&ntilde;ana.</p> <p>Here&#39;s the proof, in sonogram format:</p> <p><img alt="" src="/nature/sites/default/files/images/blog/Tadarida_brasiliensis_sonogram.JPG" /></p> <p>Keep reading to find out what bat these blue and green blobs belong to!</p> <p>Here&#39;s what Jim and Miguel have to say about our bat detector:</p> <p><a href="http://www.nhm.org/nature/blog/we-have-bat-detector-and-bats-too" target="_blank">read more</a></p> http://www.nhm.org/nature/blog/we-have-bat-detector-and-bats-too#comments bat detector bats bioacoustic monitoring Hoary Bat Jim Dines Los Angeles Nature Mexican Free-tailed Bat Miguel Ordenana Myotis Bat sonogram Blog Wed, 02 Oct 2013 17:45:41 +0000 Lila Higgins 821 at http://www.nhm.org/nature Blooming Agaves http://www.nhm.org/nature/blog/blooming-agaves <p>More plant news from the North Campus. Recently some of our blue lotus agaves, <em>Agave ceslii</em> 'Nova', have begun to bloom. This is an impressive sight as these plants send forth long spikes, (between four and six feet long), that look a lot like giant asparagus stalks. This type of agave is monocarpic, meaning that it only flowers once, and this particular selection happens to flower at a relatively young age compared to other species.</p> <p><a href="http://www.nhm.org/nature/blog/blooming-agaves" target="_blank">read more</a></p> http://www.nhm.org/nature/blog/blooming-agaves#comments agave Allen's Hummingbird bats blue lotus agave hummingbirds plants pollinators tequila Blog Sat, 11 Feb 2012 08:17:00 +0000 Lila Higgins 670 at http://www.nhm.org/nature Happy Halloween: Bats! http://www.nhm.org/nature/blog/happy-halloween-bats <p>To help celebrate Halloween here are some bats! The Big Brown Bat, <em>Eptesicus fuscus</em>, is the most common bat in our area. They are easily seen at dusk flying around parks and water sources as they search for their insect food. We're putting up a  bat box in the North Campus in hopes that some of these bats will move in.</p> <p><a href="http://www.nhm.org/nature/blog/happy-halloween-bats" target="_blank">read more</a></p> http://www.nhm.org/nature/blog/happy-halloween-bats#comments bats big brown bat halloween haory bat mammals pallid bat Blog Tue, 01 Nov 2011 06:01:00 +0000 Lila Higgins 644 at http://www.nhm.org/nature