Nature in L.A.

Showing posts with label : Blog

September 13, 2014


Every once in a while, those of us here at BioSCAN actually venture beyond the borders of Los Angeles. Sometimes when we do, we come back with insects. I was particularly excited by a couple of common, yet beautiful, insects I picked up in the South-Eastern Sierras this summer, so I thought I'd share them with you! Photo of cicada by Kelsey Bailey.
Photo of cicada by Kelsey Bailey.[/caption] The beauty above is a cicada, family Cicadidae. Although they are not commonly found in Los Angeles (although we did hear, and then locate, one in the NHM Nature Garden not long ago), cicadas of many species are found throughout California. Most cicadas have a lifespan between 2 and 5 years, with the lifespan of some species as long as 13–17 years! I collected this beauty at my annual family campout in...

September 5, 2014

The Shrunken Headed Spider Stalking Fly!

Today’s parasitic fly marvel comes in the form of an absurdly cute group of round, woolly bodied insects known as the small-headed flies (family Acroceridae). A handful of specimens of Turbopsebius diligens, the only species known west of the Rocky Mountains, turned up in only two of our BioSCAN traps, in Hollywood and University Park, an area just north of the USC Campus. At first glance, T. diligens might look like an oddly shaped bee, but to my eye, it’s as if someone took two craft pom-poms to make a miniature snowman, stuck a small fly head with giant fly eyes on top, added 6 legs and voila! To add to this bizarre image, picture this little fuzzball in motion, as humorously described by entomologist F.R. Cole: “(T. diligens) has a floating sort of flight, rather undulating and uncertain. It has the habit of buzzing around in circles when it falls over on its back on a smooth surface, often doing this for some time before it can regain...

August 28, 2014

Collembollanesque Wasp

wasp_id (1)At first glance, you might think the BioSCAN specimen above is a collembolan, or springtail (Wikipedia on springtails here.). As is often the case in the insect world, however, we find that truth is stranger than fiction. The insect above is Neodusmetia sangwani, and it's actually a flightless wasp in the family Encyrtidae. These little critters were disseminated by aircraft in 1971 as part of one of the most massively successful biological control projects of all time. Introduced from India into the Southern United States in 1964 for the control of another insect, the Rhodes grass scale, they can now be found all the way from the U.S. to Brazil. Rhodes grass scales infect (guess what?) grasses and were a very problematic pest...

August 8, 2014

BioSCAN Blues

While insects from the tropics like the famous Morpho butterfly get most of the credit for their stunning iridescent colors,  insects from more Mediterranean climates such as Los Angeles can also exhibit striking metallic exoskeletons. One such dazzling discovery, pictured below in all its glimmering azure glory, is a mason bee that has turned up from only 2 sites: our Museum's Nature Garden and our LA River adjacent site in Atwater. Solitary mason bees, like their close cousin the leaf cutter bee, use materials from their environment such as mud, leaves, or flowers to line the cells where they provision and protect their young.  This specimen stands out like a beacon (or a bee-con?)  when surrounded by mostly dark to earth-toned specimens in the sample, which prompts the question about this little flying jewel: what's the purpose of all this showiness? [caption id="attachment_500" align="alignnone" width="572...

June 12, 2014

No, it's Not an Ant!

Photo by Kelsey Bailey. Photo by Kelsey Bailey.[/caption]At first glance, the gangly creature above looks remarkably like an ant, but it is actually a flightless wasp from the family Dryinidae. Unlike ants, these wasps are solitary. They are parasitoids of insects in the order Hemiptera, the order we call "true bugs". This order includes cicadas, leafhoppers, and all manner of other plant eaters. As parasitoids, the females use a sharp ovipositor (egg laying projection) to pierce into the host hemipteran. The larva begins to grow inside the host insect, but soon begins to protrude like a giant tumor from the host body. A tough, leathery covering develops to protect the growing larva. Eventually, the larva pupates and a new adult emerges to begin the cycle anew. As you might imagine, things do not go well for the host...

June 6, 2014

Mega-moths in the City

Have you see this moth flying around Los Angeles?

My friend Kat has. She got up-close and personal with one when it flew in through her balcony window a few months ago.

It was a sultry spring evening and Kat was minding her own business until something flew into her Mid-Wilshire apartment. At first she thought it was a hummingbird as they're always flying outside her window, but as she got closer she realized it wasn't a hummingbird at all, but rather a large moth. Being a fellow nature-lover, she captured the creature under a glass jar, snapped a picture, and helped it back outside.

Saving the moth. Photo courtesy of Kat Superfisky.

Then, she texted me the picture with this caption: "what is it?" Instead of trying to write a lengthy response, I called her and told her...

June 5, 2014

Faces of BioSCAN: The Amazing Adam Wall

Photo by Kelsey Bailey.

By Emily Hartop When the BioSCAN Project moved into the Marine Biodiversity Center, the whole team soon realized the project required myriad people, talents, and skills. Adam Wall, Assistant Collections Manager of Crustacea, has a keen interest in problem solving, and soon found himself helping USC students seek answers to BioSCAN-related questions. Adam comes from a fascinating background in electrical engineering. He previously worked for JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a part of NASA) on robotics. I was excited to learn that he worked on walking robots called "spiderbots" — which even pre-BioSCAN he realized would be more accurately termed "insectbots", due to their having six legs instead of eight. These walking robots were being developed as alternatives to the more...

May 22, 2014

The Coffin Fly

Photo by Kelsey Bailey. Photo by Kelsey Bailey. 

As you well know, we are fly obsessed here at BioSCAN. Particularly, we are phorid obsessed. I am particularly obsessed with the macabre species Conicera tibialis, commonly known as the Coffin Fly. Perhaps it's the shadowy lighting as I view them under the microscope, but these flies, with their dark velvety bodies and (almost sinister looking) conical antennae (males only, females have round antennae), appeal to me tremendously. Photo by Kelsey Bailey. Photo by Kelsey Bailey

A number of phorid species are known to colonize humans remains, but C. tibialis...

May 15, 2014

Molten Aluminum + Ants = BUG FAIR!

A note about specimen sacrifice: We do not advocate needless killing of any creature, big or small. Unfortunately, there are aspects of science that we are unable to examine without sacrifice.
Photo by Doug Booher.
Photo by Doug Booher.
A note about specimen sacrifice: We do not advocate needless killing of any creature, big or small. Unfortunately, there are aspects of science that we are unable to examine without sacrifice. The ant nest that was used for our cast was sacrificed to create an amazing and permanent research and educational tool. The loss of one nest allows us tremendous insight into this species, which will benefit future efforts at understanding and conserving these native insects. As a reseach natural history museum, specimens are prepared and maintained at the highest museum standards, so that they will...

May 8, 2014

Going Native

A local bumble bee, photographed by BioSCAN Principal Investigator Brian Brown.

By Emily Hartop Out of the hundreds of bee species found in Los Angeles County, a single species gets most of our attention: Apis mellifera, the European honey bee. This species has a relationship with man that has existed for centuries. It is an exotic species that was introduced to North America. In addition to being widespread in the wild, they are widely used for pollination of commercial crops, as well as for honey — that sweet elixir of regurgitated nectar that is excellent in tea, cookies, breads, cakes, and all manner of other culinary delights. If you would like to know more about this species, we suggest the fun read "Sweetness and Light" by Hattie Ellis — what we'd like to focus on here are the many ...