Follow us on FacebookFollow us on TwitterFollow us on FlickrFollow us on YouTubeFollow us on PinterestFollow us on Instagram

The Making of a Diorama

The Habitat Views video considers ways of looking at dioramas today, and documents the creation of several new displays. Take a look over on our  YouTube channel >

Recreating Nature Indoors

Ever wonder who made the dioramas in our mammal halls? Read all about the artists who created these wonderful scenes. Learn more >

First Fridays 2014: LA Stories...Walk on the Wild Side

L.A.’s hottest, smartest nighttime event is back! Come have a cocktail, explore the Museum after-hours, and get enlightened.

Tickets are on sale now.
Purchase yours today!

 

Grizzly bear

Ursus arctos (Linnaeus, 1758)

Grizzly bear diorama in the North American Mammal Hall

Scene:

 Near Karluk Lake, Kodiak Island, Alaska

Sponsor:

 Tom and Valley Knudsen Foundation

Background artist:

 Robert Russell Reid

Also present:

 Coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch)

Grizzly bears are normally active at night and during twilight hours. They have poor sight but excellent hearing and smell. Often ill-tempered, they may attack without provocation.

The world-record grizzly bear was collected near Karluk Lake on Kodiak Island, Alaska, on 23 May 1952. Just out of hibernation, the bear weighed 1,190 pounds; the hide alone weighed 157 pounds. The skull measured 17 15/16 at its greatest length without the lower jaw, and 12 13/6 at its greatest width and is conserved in our collections.


Biological Information

Range map for the grizzly bear

Range:

Northwestern North America

Habitat:

Open grasslands, tundra, and lightly forested areas

Status:

Great Plains grizzly (Ursus arctos horribilis) is endangered; elsewhere in North America the grizzly is threatened

Diet:

Vegetation, grubs, rodents and salmon; carnivorous in Canadian Rockies

Further information about this species may be found on the Animal Diversity Web page for brown bear.