Follow us on FacebookFollow us on TwitterFollow us on FlickrFollow us on YouTubeFollow us on PinterestFollow us on Instagram

The Making of a Diorama

The Habitat Views video considers ways of looking at dioramas today, and documents the creation of several new displays. Take a look over on our  YouTube channel >

Do Dolphins Have Hair?

Our mammal researchers answer this and other questions on our Mammalogy FAQs page.
Learn more >

Recreating Nature Indoors

Ever wonder who made the dioramas in our mammal halls? Read all about the artists who created these wonderful scenes. Learn more >

Our Exhibits Meet State Standards!

Our diorama halls are just one place where teachers and chaperones can meet State Standards! To download easy-to-use field trip guides that are aligned with Standards.
Learn More

 

Ringtail

Bassariscus astutus (Lichtenstein, 1830)

Ringtail diorama in the North American Mammal Hall

Scene:

 Rock outcrop in Whipple Mountains, five miles west of Parker Dam in southeastern California.

Sponsor:

 Kenneth E. Stager

Background artist:

 Steve Hill and James R. Olson

Also present:

 Deermouse (Peromyscus maniculatus),
western banded gecko (Coleonyx variegatus),
night snake (Hypsiglena torquata),
tarantula (Aphonopelma chalcodes),
stink beetle (Eleodes sp).

The ringtail, the state mammal of Arizona, is a member of the raccoon family and is native to the New World. Nocturnal and shy, it is seldom seen in the wild.


Biological Information

Range map for the ringtail

Range:

Mountains, badlands and forests in southwestern United States to Baja California and southern Mexico

Habitat:

Shelter-providing rocky broken areas in a variety of habitats ranging from mountain to desert

Status:

Common in mountainous and rocky terrain, less so in forests

Diet:

Omnivorous: small mammals, grasshoppers, beetles, fruits, eggs, lizards, and carrion

Further information about this species may be found on the Animal Diversity Web page for ringtail.