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BioSCAN Collecting and Sorting

Exploration Tour

BioSCAN Collecting and Sorting

BioSCAN Collecting and Sorting

BioSCAN Collecting and Sorting

Nature Walk


A Wild, New NHM for L.A.

In the Nature Gardens, L.A.'s plants and wild animals — and you — have a delightful new home. You can spot butterflies and hummingbirds, observe and track species with our scientists, take nature walks with NHM's educators, participate in gardening classes, and explore 3½-acres of cool new trails!

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  • Western Pond Turtle

    Did You Know? These shy natives are being beat out in Los Angeles by Red-eared Slider turtles, which are bossier, faster, bigger, and lay more eggs.

    See them in action
  • Opossum

    Did You Know? Opossums not only play dead, they drool too - perhaps to look sick and unappetizing to predators.

    See them in action
  • Raccoon

    Did You Know?  Raccoons can live practically anywhere!  In more rural areas, raccoons nest in tree hollows and underground dens. In the city, they like to make homes in abandoned cars, sewers, or your chimney.

    See them in action
  • Pillbug

    Did You Know? Pillbugs (aka rolly-pollys) are not bugs at all. They are actually crustaceans -- related to crabs and lobsters!

    See them in action
  • Ladybug

    Did You Know? Ladybugs and beetles are your backyard's fiercest killers.

    See them in action
  • Monarch Butterfly

    Did You Know? In winter months, monarch butterflies hang out on the West Coast between Mendocino and San Diego.

    See them in action

Put Nature on the Map

Here or anywhere -- outside, at school, at home, in a park, on a hike -- take a picture of the plants and animals you see, and help us build our Nature Map. Your contribution could be L.A.'s next, great wildlife discovery!

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Spotted!

Our Spider Survey discovered the first documented brown widows in the city. Today, in some neighborhoods, the brown widow is more common than the black widow!

Photo: Matthew Field